5 Best Hikes in British Columbia with Scenic Views

5 Best Hikes in British Columbia with Scenic Views

5 Best  Hikes in British Columbia with Scenic Views

 

Welcome to The Happy Hippie.

A Lifestyle blog and source for Cannabis, inspiration and knowledge.

For our first post we would like to recommend 5 scenic nature hikes for every fitness level to accommodate with some stellar ganja. We’re currently smoking Northern Lights.(pictured below) If you are a fan of this lovely strain, you can find some growing tips here from Leafly. This sweet, earthy indica isn’t to heavy to send us out for a trek into the wilderness of British Columbia.

Cannabis, Joints, weed

 

#1

Welcome to Wells Gray Park. This massive provincial park is bordered on every side by different types of terrain and these merge within the boundaries to give the park its great diversity. According to B.C. Parks, Wells Gray contains over 700 species of vascular plants, over 200 species of mushrooms, 56 species of mammals and 219 species of birds. This large wilderness park located in east-central BC, Canada. The park protects most of the southern, and highest, regions of the Cariboo Mountains and covers 5,250 square kilometres (524,990 hectares or 1.3 million acres). It is British Columbia’s fourth largest park.

Wells Gray is a relatively easy hike and there are many tour guide busses that will take you if you don’t have a vehicle to take you there!

Wells Gray Provincial Park

 

 

 

#2

Johnson Lake – Aka the Caribbean of the North. This crystal turquoise lake does not look like most of our lakes here in BC. This beautiful colour comes from the amount of limestone found in the lake. This tourist hot spot is popular for kayaking, fishing, paddle boarding and many other outdoor activities during summer. #2 of the list is also located in the Cariboo region, Canada. With an elevation of 3,800 feet, this lake is more than five kilometres in length, with a maximum depth of approximately 200 feet. To get there drive 35km east of Barrier and Highway 5.

 

 

#3

The Grouse Grind – Mother Nature’s Stairmaster. This hike is much harder than the first two mentioned. Hiking on an incline, the whole 2.9-km trail with some 2,830 steps leading to Grouse Mountain’s peak is well worth it in the end with a view like that! This trail is open from spring till fall only as Grouse Mountain has alpine skiing during the winter months. While you can descend back down the steep mountain by foot, you also have the option of taking the gondola back down for about 10 bucks if your legs feel like absolute jello after the fact(mine sure did).

 

 

#4

The Chief – Located in Squamish, this hike is truly rewarding at the top. Tough but not difficult. Steep steps to start and some moderate climbing (chain assisted) between the 1st and 2nd peaks. You may also bring dogs(on leash) on this 6.4km loop.

Hiking the Squamish Chief, British Columbia, Canada

 

 

#5

 The Capillano Suspension bridge and Lynn Canyon Park – The 450 ft long, 230 ft high Capilano Suspension Bridge has excited visitors since 1889. While the bridge and stunning location is a Vancouver landmark, Capilano Suspension Bridge Park offers an all-encompassing BC experience. While there are several trails, waterfalls and swimming holes located around Lynn Canyon Park as well, and with Baden Powell trail being one of the most popular during the summer months. During the winter months there is a winter festival called Canyon Lights which captures the feeling of holiday excitement over the season by transforming the suspension bridge, treetops, cliff walk and the rainforest with hundreds of thousands of lights throughout the park. For more information visit the official website

Canyon Lights at Capilano Suspension bridge North Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada

Photo courtesy of https://www.capbridge.com/explore/canyon-lights/

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